From the category archives:

Critics & Reviews

Post image for An Interview with Zachary Karabashliev

(This post is a part of the Artistic Innovation blog salon curated by Caridad Svich for the 2013 TCG National Conference: Learn Do Teach in Dallas). The Interviewee Zachary Karabashliev lives in San Diego, California, but was born in Varna, Bulgaria. After finishing his Master’s in Bulgarian Philology, writing and publishing in literary journals, he won a green card [...]

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Post image for (Critical) Power to the People

(Photo: Laura Roudabush) iCritic™, an initiative, developed as part of ‘Barrington Stage 2.0’, got its genesis from TCG’s New Generations Program, funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation/The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in 2010. Now over a year later, it is time find out how iCritic is progressing. Laura Roudabush, Director of Marketing for Barrington [...]

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Reasons to be Critical

by Diep Tran November 9, 2011 American Theatre magazine
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For a full ill-advised minute (actually, more like ten months), I had considered being a theatre critic. And then, I realize two things: I really disliked reading my own opinions and criticism was a hard and mostly thankless job. When you give a theatre artist a good review, they admire you and your writing and [...]

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Condition:Critical

by Rob Weinert-Kendt November 11, 2010 Critics & Reviews
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I was recently invited to speak on the panel “Condition: Critical,” Monday, Oct. 25 at the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, The Graduate Center, CUNY. Present at this wide-ranging discussion among my colleagues and myself was avid theatergoer Martha Wade Steketee, who wrote a version of this post on her blog. We’re reprinting it here [...]

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Stars Align with Stage Work

by Rob Weinert-Kendt June 30, 2010 Critics & Reviews
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There’s been a lot of talk since the Tony Awards broadcast, with its Glee production numbers, its Green Day performance, and its high celebrity quotient, that Broadway stages have been invaded by interlopers. Actor Hunter Foster has even started a Facebook group, “Give the Tonys Back to Broadway,” which has garnered nearly 9,000 members fired [...]

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This Was the Conference That Was

by Rob Weinert-Kendt June 24, 2010 Critics & Reviews
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TCG’s National Conference in Chicago last week was a record-breaker, with upwards of 900 attendees crowding more than 50 breakout sessions, 17 affinity groups, four plenaries and 16 “manifestos.” One of America’s most vibrant theatre cities proved an ideal host, not only for its theatre-friendliness—epitomized by Mayor Daley’s Saturday morning speech on the value of [...]

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American Theatre’s Randy Gener Awarded the ‘Rube’

by TCG News June 10, 2010 American Theatre magazine
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[Photo by Rick Maiman] The Deadline Club, the New York City chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), honored the best of the best in New York area journalism June 7 at the Annual Dinner of the Deadline Club Awards, one of New York City’s most prestigious journalism awards, at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. American [...]

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Broadway Musical ‘Next to Normal’ Nominated for a Webby Award

by Katie Barry April 23, 2010 Critics & Reviews
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The Broadway musical Next to Normal is up for a Webby Award for its use of social media in advertising. Although the play has done several interesting social media events including a YouTube Mash up contest and a song written with help from Twitter users, its Webby nomination comes for its Twitter Performance, a tweeted [...]

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The Second Impression

by August Schulenburg April 12, 2010 Critics & Reviews
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(photograph by Eric Y. Exit) You never get a second chance to make a first impression. But if you’re an ambitious, challenging new play, it may be the second impression that counts. Critic Chris Jones of the Chicago Tribune wrote a mixed review of Rebecca Gilman’s A True History of the Johnstown Flood, playing now [...]

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More American History Musicals, Please!

by Rob Weinert-Kendt April 8, 2010 Critics & Reviews
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The ecstatic reception for the musical Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson at New York’s Public Theatre, which depicts our 7th president as a tight-jean-wearing “emo” rock star, made me realize that it represents a vastly under-explored genre: the American history musical. Apart from the Founding Fathers tuner 1776, the field is pretty clear of shows that [...]

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But Some of My Best Friends Are Critics

by Rob Weinert-Kendt April 1, 2010 Critics & Reviews
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Should playwrights review theatre, the way authors commonly review each other’s books? That’s the simple question posed by Time Out New York theatre editor David Cote in a recent blog post for the Guardian, and it reminded me of a contentious reader talkback that New Yorker critic John Lahr did last year, in which Lahr—who’s [...]

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Fear of a Brit Planet

by Rob Weinert-Kendt March 26, 2010 Critics & Reviews
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The New York Times‘ Charles Isherwood raised some hackles with a perfectly reasonable piece back in February positing that New Yorkers should not only welcome the Royal Shakespeare Company’s upcoming 2011 residency at the Park Avenue Armory as part of the Lincoln Center Festival but use the momentum, and the venue, to inspire Stateside efforts [...]

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How To Move Past Not There Yet

by August Schulenburg March 24, 2010 Critics & Reviews
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“Back in 1918 before women had the right to vote, the percentage of new plays in New York, written by women, was higher. It was higher before we had the vote.”

-Theresa Rebeck

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Slap Happy or Sappy?

by Rob Weinert-Kendt March 1, 2010 Critics & Reviews

Something tells me that L.A. Times critic Charles McNulty doesn’t much care for musicals: “When the two singing ghosts of Duncan Sheik and Kyle Jarrow’s new indie-spirited chamber musical “Whisper House” deliver the opening number, “Better to Be Dead,” the show tips its hand that it has no intention of playing by conventional rules. A [...]

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